People are ditching in-person financial services for apps | Technology

“People are trying digital finance for the first time,” Perret said. “It’s going from an attitude where people think, ‘I do my banking in person,’ or, ‘I do financial services in person,’ to an attitude of thinking, ‘I could use these digital services.’ Breaking that zero-to-one gap, that’s the biggest gap.”

What’s next for fintech?

While the growing demand for fintech is promising for the industry, concerns about data privacy and cybersecurity could be a hurdle for further growth.

In a recent survey by international law firm Goodwin of more than 700 global business leaders about fintech trends, nearly half ranked cybersecurity as the largest threat to the adoption of digital financial services. There are also issues like possible tech glitches as users are trying to make crucial transactions, as happened to several online brokerages on the day that Apple and Tesla stock started trading at newly split prices last

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Post-COVID-19 economy will put people back to work, but it won’t be in all the same jobs: Don Pittis



a sign on a wooden pole: Real estate data later today from the Canadian Real Estate Association is expected to show persistent strength, but post-recovery employment will depend on a different set of jobs.


Real estate data later today from the Canadian Real Estate Association is expected to show persistent strength, but post-recovery employment will depend on a different set of jobs.

Propelled by sharp cuts in interest rates, so far it seems the housing market and the jobs it generates will continue to be a linchpin of the Canadian economy.

While many credible voices, including Evan Siddall at the Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation, have warned we may be setting ourselves up for a fall, home sales and construction show few signs of slumping in Canada’s hottest markets.

Today’s latest data from the Canadian Real Estate Association will provide a clearer picture, but if housing persists throughout the current pandemic as prime job creator, it may be a special case.

Just as industries renew themselves through the process of creative destruction during economic downturns, research conducted long before the current crisis indicates that

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With the economy tanking, more people seeking unclaimed cash

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. (AP) — Florida is seeing a surge in people making claims for unclaimed property since the coronavirus pandemic has shaken up the state’s economy, but apparently President Donald Trump hasn’t made an effort to have money returned to him.

Florida Chief Financial Officer Jimmy Patronis said in a telephone interview that the state is setting records for the amount of money being returned to people since the pandemic began.

“We pushed out over $38 million just in the month of March. That’s the second highest month in the history of the program,” Patronis said. “Just during the COVID-19 pandemic time, we’ve pushed out almost $124 million. That’s $124 million that’s going back into the economy. That’s money that’s not sitting in our accounts anymore.”

There are millions of accounts with unclaimed property. It could be a savings account someone forgot about, a car insurance refund, inheritances and more.

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