2000+ Personal Statement Examples | By Subject

Personal

Learning the fundamentals of this subject will pave the way to many career options, including a data analyst, stockbroker, forensic accountant and external auditor.

View 145 Economics Personal Statements

Study the earth’s physical structures and scientific processes to prepare yourself for a career in urban planning, environmental consultancy, conservation and many more.

View 58 Geography Personal Statements

Develop a critical awareness of the common law legal tradition and apply problem-solving skills to a range of legal and non-legal settings.

View 157 Law Personal Statements

A popular degree course, with a practical focus, that allows you to develop your professional skills and knowledge as you study to become a qualified social worker.

View 24 Social Work Personal Statements

Discover how to manage buildings by exploring topics such as project management, legal and technical advice, building reports, defect diagnosis and conservation.

View 1 Surveying Personal Statement

Learn about all kinds of animals, including their anatomy, physiology, genetics, and their adaptations for survival and reproduction in different environments.

View 6 Zoology Personal Statements

The UCAS personal statement is an important piece of writing you need to put together for your UCAS application.

It is where students should sell themselves in order to try and secure a place at their chosen universities. This includes your strengths, achievements, interests and ambitions, and you need to convey why the university should choose you over other candidates.

We recommend you start by making some notes about what you want to study at university and why, as well as a list of skills and interests, and your gap year plans (if you have any).

We then suggest reading some example personal statements for inspiration, and to see how previous students have successfully applied for courses at university.

This should give you an idea of how to put your own statement together, starting with an attention-grabbing opening that explains what aspects of your subject you enjoy and why.

The next few paragraphs need to cover your relevant work experience and activities outside of school, as well as your interests or hobbies, and anything else you’ve done related to your subject that isn’t already on your UCAS form.

The final paragraph should round off your statement succinctly and talk about your future plans after university, and how a degree can help you achieve these.

Remember that the language you use and the way it is laid out will be judged too, so it’s important to get all aspects of your statement right.

Once you’ve written your personal statement, ask family, friends and tutors to read it and give you some feedback. Look through their comments and amend your statement accordingly (if you feel they improve it).

Try to ask for several rounds of feedback to make sure it’s as good as it can be before sending it off.

Make sure you back up everything you say with solid examples, using your initial notes to help you.

Talk about your motivations for choosing this particular course, and showcase all strengths using your own voice.

Don’t embellish the truth or lie outright (you’ll get caught out at the interview!), and don’t use humour or tell jokes (this isn’t the time or place).

These tips and advice apply to all personal statements, whether you’re applying for an undergraduate or postgraduate course. If you follow them, you will have a better chance of securing a place at your chosen universities.

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